Dates soon to be announced for Elan North & South and Ricochet Test marches. THOSE WHO DARE NOTHING…NEED HOPE FOR NOTHING….WHO DARES WINS
       

"Point to Point obliterates whatever isn't Point to Point."

Chief Instructor of Joint UKSF SAS and SBS Selection

Over the years various nicknames have been unofficially attached to each march and have stuck to the extent that these names are now what they are known by. Point to Point's somewhat gentle moniker is owed to all the major RV points being located at high points spread out across the eastern side of the Brecon Beacons National Park. What gives this march its unique characteristics are a combination of the location of checkpoints and the order in which they must be visited. Route selection plays a part as it does with most Selection marches, and as always there is a long way around or a more direct route between RV points. However, here Point to Point comes into its own and assumes a legendary status where the famous words of a course Chief Instructor ring compellingly harrowing and true. "Point to Point obliterates whatever isn't Point to Point."

To make each RV and breach the undisclosed final time limit to ultimately pass this march, the volunteer has no option but to take on some of the most shockingly steep and brutal slopes in the entire Beacons range. After negotiating a sequence of murderous inclines, scree strewn gullies and crossing a series of leg sapping boggy plateaus, volunteers will come face to face with the infamous VW (Voluntary Withdrawal) Valley. It is here that so many have chosen to give up and return to the nearest roadside or track and hand in their notice to Directing Staff. And for those who make it over the other side, the grid reference to the next RV is enough to make anyone with weakened spirits crack completely. And still beyond that lies only more suffering if you are to reach the FRV (Final RV).

However, for those with the right temperament there is far more to this otherwise sinister march than suffering. Point to Point follows what is arguably the most spectacular, inspiring and stunningly beautiful route of all the six Test Week marches. It is also for many the most satisfying to complete. A real sense of achievement and well-being is experienced by those taking on the landscape and features that Point to Point has to offer. We believe this comes from the sense that you are climbing rather than walking, such is the demanding nature of the slopes and terrain. It is little wonder that some of the greatest adventure literature has been composed by mountaineers describing the sheer joy of how the mind and body feels to work ones way up a mountain. Leaning into a slope and pushing into the next step can be physically demanding but soul cleansing as the mind is focused intently on nothing but the present moment.

POINT TO POINT LOAD BEARING REQUIREMENTS

CATEGORY

BLADE:
SF:
MAIN FIELD:

LOAD

45lb Plus food and water
30lb Plus food and water
Mountain Safety clothing and equipment only

CRITERIA

Anyone attempting the Point to Point test march must have completed the Fan Dance (summer or winter edition) and the Test March associated Training Day. We welcome independent applications (discounted) from current or former serving members of the armed forces.

ALL FOR WHAT: THE POINT TO POINT FINISHER'S PATCH

Upon passing Selection soldiers are presented only with a modest winged dagger cloth cap badge stitched onto a sandy beret. True to the SAS Regimental ethos, in particular humility, each of the six test marches will have its own uniquely designed cloth patch with it's own equally unique background story.

THE POINT TO POINT SAS TEST MARCH EVENT: A STORY IN PICTURES AND WORDS

 

 

LEGENDS CAST LONG SHADOWS
WORDS BY TIM DONATI-FORD

I knew I was never going to be made of the "right stuff", but I wanted to get as close as I could to knowing what it might be like. We have all read books about the guys who are made of "it", and without fear of contradiction every man Jack of you have thought, "is it really that hard?", myself included. Well the answer is very simple, no it's not...it's harder! The best you can hope for is to walk in their shadows, and even then you feel as if you're not worthy to do so, I know I'm not.

http://donatiford.blogspot.mx/

POINT TO POINT: HELL ON THE HIGH HILLS
WORDS BY STEPHEN MOORE

At stages I’m gripping the grass in front of my face with my hands because of the sheer steepness of the slope. I sometimes grab thistles but don't care, I slip a couple of times and my heart leaps out of my mouth as I hug tightly against the grass. I weigh 70kg with a 50lb wet bergen on, it feels as though it wants to pull me over backwards.

https://hellonhighhills.wordpress.com/2015/05/31/point-2-point-2/

TRUE GRIT
WORDS BY IAN FORD

Stuart, one of the DS, otherwise known as pit-bull, started barking orders left and right. ‘Form up in two lines!’, ‘Turn your bloody head torches off!’, ‘Do you know where you are? No? Why not?’ The ferocity of this verbal assault coming out of the darkness caused widespread panic and alarm. For me, it didn’t instil fear,I was loving it.

https://hike4autism.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/point-to-point/

POINT TO POINT: THE ORIGINAL SAS TEST WEEK MARCH
WORDS BY JAMES ALLEN

I had completed the Paras' 10 at Colchester and Catterick. I had also completed the Fan Dance with Avalanche Endurance Events. Now they were offering something which was longer, tougher, altogether a very different proposition. Point To Point was definitely not something from the local pony club gymkhana, and by the time we finished it we were agreed on one thing - it made the Fan Dance seem like a sprint.

http://jamesablog.starjump.org/?p=6292

BERETS AND CAP BADGES…
WORDS BY KAROL WICINSKI

Somebody I respect very much told me the other day that you might have the worst job in the world but what makes the difference is who are you doing this job with. Berets, badges, nicknames are worth as much as people who are wearing them. Few weeks later, if I’d had a choice to win whole run on my own or being last getting to the final RV with Mark I wouldn’t think twice. No offence Staff but your trophy is nothing compare to the new friend I have.

http://9peakschallenge.com/uncategorized/point-to-point/#more-612

NO EASY DAY OUT
WORDS BY MARKK LUNQVIST

So I gave him pretty much all of the food I'd carried and made sure he ate it, despite his protests. But it wasn't just about keeping my navigator awake and switched on. I would've given him the smock off my back if he needed it... I would've carried his bergen if he couldn't manage. Because that's just what you'd do. That bond that forms through shared hardship doesn't take long to cure, and it cures strong. I would've taken any burden for him in those ten hours on the hills, and I'm sure others felt the same way about their muckers.

http://marklundqvist.blogspot.co.uk/